Innovation and Impact

Fall 2022 Innovation and Impact Courses

  • CCCX 310: Accessible Chicago

    Section 01
    Taught by: Jackie Spinner (Communication)
    Fridays, 9-11:50am, 618, #207 

    In this class, the topic of disability access provides a focus for employing a range of ideation strategies to imagine and create a future for fully accessible communities. Students will investigate barriers in site-specific situations, and create proposals and plans of action to address and remedy inaccessibility. Rather than approaching any given disability as a ‘problem to solve,’ the course emphasizes inclusivity of human diversity. Together, we will explore the political, social and cultural aspects of a number of disabilities as we work to create a world that is fully accessible to all. The larger goal is for students to take the lessons learned in this course, to apply to them to their own disciplines, and to be change agents for a better, more accessible world.   

  • CCCX 315: Media & Social Justice

    Section 01
    Taught by: Monique Maye (Business and Entrepreneurship)
    Tuesdays, 9-11:50am, 618, #B01

    Section 02
    Taught by: Clayton Smith (Business and Entrepreneurship)
    Wednesdays, 9-11:50am, 618, #B01 

    #marchforourlives #blacklivesmatter #metoo #climatechangeisreal are just a few examples of many social justice issues vying for the attention of the masses. Why do some rise to the top of the public consciousness while others struggle? It’s all about effective use of media, from strategy to messaging to content. Our focus will be on the strategic use of media to fight inequalities and prejudice using entrepreneurial thinking, communication skills and technology. In this Innovation and Impact course, students will learn how a community can use media to steer conversations, grab attention, deconstruct power and, ultimately, gain resources to have an equitable impact on a specific issue of social justice. Through interviews, case studies, archival research, and weekly journal entries, students will develop a baseline understanding of media outreach practices that foreground community agency. The semester-long collaborative inquiry will conclude with group presentations of strategic, equity-focused media developed in dialogue with community leaders.

  • CCCX 316: Equitable Futures

    Section 01: Environmental Equity in Chicago
    Taught by: Beth Davis-Berg (Science and Mathematics)
    Tuesdays, 3:30-6:20pm, Web 

    Chicago is a city of diverse neighborhoods and communities. Some of these neighborhoods and communities have brownfields, air pollution, and incinerators but others do not.  How have and do structural policies like zoning laws, decisions of the city council, and other factors contribute to the types and location of environmental issues in the city? Can we understand the impact of these environmental issues directly or indirectly on the lives of people in these communities? In this Innovation and Impact course, students will use methods including site visits, research, interviews, and more to better understand some of the environmental inequities in our region. Students will research a variety of polluted sites and related environmental issues to explore issues of environmental inequity and to design approaches that address this inequity. Students will deliver a final project that proposes an approach on how to improve, educate, remediate, or advocate for a method that would support community members in addressing environmental issues. Examples of environmental issues may include brownfields, air pollution, incinerators, and other planned developments on current green spaces.  

  • CCCX 399: Innovation and Impact

    Section 01: Innovating the Art of Gathering
    Taught by: Melanie Chambliss (Humanities, History, and Social Sciences)
    Mondays/Wednesdays, 3:30-4:50pm, 618, #207

    This course will explore the history of nineteenth- and twentieth-century Black gatherings including the Black Convention Movement, Fisk Jubilee concerts, the Pan-African Congresses, and Columbia’s own 1968 “Arts and the Inner City” conference. Students will study their aims, approaches, accomplishments and failures and discuss how conveners tried to create transformative gatherings. Students will have the opportunity to redesign a version of these meetings using the principles of innovation learned in this course. Class discussions and assignments will also be used to plan for Columbia’s Black Arts Festival in February 2023.

Summer 2022 Innovation and Impact Courses

  • CCCX 310: Accessible Chicago

    Section 01
    Taught by: Diana Gorman Jamrozik (American Sign Language)
    5-week session, 7/5/22-8/6/22
    Mondays/Tuesdays/Wednesdays 12:30-3:20 p.m.
    Hybrid, 623, 109

    In this class, the topics of disability, access, and the Americans with Disabilities Act provide a focus for employing a range of ideation strategies to imagine and design fully accessible common spaces at Columbia College Chicago. Rather than approaching any given disability as a ‘problem to solve,’ the course emphasizes inclusivity of human diversity. Students will collaborate to create a collective vision for barrier free lobby, library, exhibition, and performance spaces. The larger goal is for students to take the lessons learned in this course, to apply to them to their own disciplines, and to be change agents for a better, more accessible world.

  • CCCX 311: Cultivating Food Equity

    Section 01
    Taught by: Dana Connell (Fashion Studies) and Peg Murphy (Communication)
    10-week session, 5/31/22 - 8/6/22
    Asynchronous Web 

    Have you heard the phrase, “eating from the rainbow?” Nutrition experts say, the more colorful the food on your plate, the more nutrients in each meal. Loading up a plate with colorful foods isn’t always easy for many in Chicago and other urban areas who don’t have access to well-stocked, affordable, and accessible grocery stores. In this Innovation and Impact class, students will research a variety of food sources in Chicago and imagine how to cultivate a more equitable food supply chain in an urban market. Through site visits, research, interviews, and real-life role play, students will better understand the underlying causes of food deserts that impact health and wellness. What would food equity look like in the future for an urban city like Chicago? Students will deliver a solution-oriented final project that may address physical grocery needs, opportunities to grow food, programs to educate, or any other possible solution that addresses a root cause.

  • CCCX 314: Social Justice Creative Placemaking

    Section 01
    Taught by: Robert Hanserd (Humanities, History, and Social Sciences)
    5-week session, 7/5/22 – 8/6/22
    Mondays/Wednesdays, 9:00am – 1:50pm
    Hybrid, 618, 207 

    In this course, students will collaborate with each other to explore new futures for public spaces that focus on an equity-based, social justice theme. Examples of public spaces include parks, public venues, walk and bike ways, public buildings, and other places where people gather to share and build community. Students will research social, technical and policy issues around public space with consideration to gender, age, race, ethnicity, poverty and health. Through site visits, research and iterative design, students will learn to assess, propose, and plan a project. Students will produce a final proposal addressing social justice through an equity-based creative placemaking plan that incorporates research and input from stakeholders in the community.

Spring 2022 Innovation and Impact Courses

  • CCCX 311: Cultivating Food Equity

    Cultivating Food Equity
    Instructor: Dana Connell (Fashion) 
    Asynchronous WEB

    Have you heard the phrase, “eating from the rainbow?” Nutrition experts say, the more colorful the food on your plate, the more nutrients in each meal. Loading up a plate with colorful foods isn’t always easy for many in Chicago and other urban areas who don’t have access to well-stocked, affordable, and accessible grocery stores. In this Innovation and Impact class, students will research a variety of food sources in Chicago and imagine how to cultivate a more equitable food supply chain in an urban market. Through site visits, research, interviews, and real-life role play, students will better understand the underlying causes of food deserts that impact health and wellness. What would food equity look like in the future for an urban city like Chicago? Students will deliver a solution-oriented final project that may address physical grocery needs, opportunities to grow food, programs to educate, or any other possible solution that addresses a root cause.

  • CCCX 314: Social Justice Creative Placemaking

    CCCX 311: Social Justice Creative Placemaking
    Instructor: Brian Shaw (Theatre)
    Fridays 12:30-3:20 p.m., SPER, #421

    In this course, students will collaborate with each other to explore new futures for public spaces that focus on an equity-based, social justice theme. Examples of public spaces include parks, public venues, walk and bike ways, public buildings, and other places where people gather to share and build community. Students will research social, technical and policy issues around public space with consideration to gender, age, race, ethnicity, poverty and health. Through site visits, research and iterative design, students will learn to assess, propose, and plan a project. Students will produce a final proposal addressing social justice through an equity-based creative placemaking plan that incorporates research and input from stakeholders in the community. 

  • CCCX 315: Media and Social Justice

    Section 01
    Instructor: Shanita Akintonde (Communication)
    Tuesdays 9:00-11:50 a.m., 618, #207

    Section 02
    Instructor: Jeff Spitz (Cinema and Television Arts)
    Wednesdays 12:30-3:20 p.m., 618, #207

    Section 03
    Instructor: Clayton Smith (Business and Entrepreneurship)
    Thursdays 9:00-11:50 a.m., SPER, #421

    Section 04
    Instructor: Monique Maye (Business and Entrepreneurship)
    Tuesdays 12:30-3:20 p.m., SPER, #421

    Section 05
    Instructor: Robert Hanserd (Humanities, History, and Social Sciences)
    Mondays 12:30-3:20 p.m., Hybrid, 623, #207

    #marchforourlives #blacklivesmatter #metoo #climatechangeisreal are just a few examples of many social justice issues vying for the attention of the masses. Why do some rise to the top of the public consciousness while others struggle? It’s all about effective use of media, from strategy to messaging to content. Our focus will be on the strategic use of media to fight inequalities and prejudice using entrepreneurial thinking, communication skills and technology. In this Innovation and Impact course, students will learn how a community can use media to steer conversations, grab attention, deconstruct power and, ultimately, gain resources to have an equitable impact on a specific issue of social justice. Through interviews, case studies, archival research, and weekly journal entries, students will develop a baseline understanding of media outreach practices that foreground community agency. The semester-long collaborative inquiry will conclude with group presentations of strategic, equity-focused media developed in dialogue with community leaders.

  • CCCX 399: Topics in Innovation and Impact

    Section 01: A 21st Century World’s Fair
    Instructor: Hilary Sarat-St. Peter (English and Creative Writing) 
    Mondays 9:00-11:50 a.m., 618, #207

    In Imagining a 21st Century World’s Fair students will utilize observational, archival and analytical research methods to explore world expositions as problematic cases of innovation and impact. Students will examine primary and secondary sources, including eyewitness accounts, artifacts and fictional works. These sources will assist students in understanding how world expositions have sparked and sustained innovative projects such as business ventures, social and civic services, and creative projects in arts, media, the sciences, and design. The course will equip students with concepts and resources for understanding how race, gender, sexuality, disability and difference construct our past and future experiences. In the final weeks, students will employ a range of methodologies drawn from the course experiences and their own disciplinary backgrounds to build a collective vision for an equitable and inclusive 21st Century World’s Fair.

     

    Section 02: Defending Democracy
    Instructor: Sharon Bloyd-Peshkin (Communication) 
    Mondays 12:30-3:20pm, 618, #207

    In this class, we will explore the importance and impact of voting, the historical and current practices of voter suppression, and past and present movements for voting rights. We will meet voting advocates from Chicago and around the country and learn about their motivations, challenges and practices. We will also investigate contemporary barriers to voting for specific local communities and partner with them on proposals and plans of action to expand voting information and access. The larger goal is for students to become change agents for a more democratic society through creation of solution-oriented final projects that incorporate research and input from stakeholders in the community to enhance voting access.

     

    Section 03: Emancipatory Technologies
    Instructor: Rojhat Avsar (Humanities, History, and Social Sciences) 
    Tuesdays 12:30-3:20 p.m., Hybrid, 618, #207

    This course helps students explore a series of organizational innovations, and computer and manufacturing technologies that have the unique potential to expand economic opportunity and increase individual autonomy. Specifically, the course covers blockchain, cooperatives, and 3D-printing as case studies. These technologies are emancipatory in the sense that they tend to eliminate many "gatekeepers” (e.g., middlemen) that are currently blocking access to opportunity and capital.  

     

    Section 04: Environmental Equity in Chicago
    Instructor: Beth Davis-Berg (Science and Mathematics)
    Tuesdays 3:30-6:20 p.m., WEB

    Chicago is a city of diverse neighborhoods and communities. Some of these neighborhoods and communities have brownfields, air pollution, and incinerators but others do not.  How have and do structural policies like zoning laws, decisions of the city council, and other factors contribute to the types and location of environmental issues in the city? Can we understand the impact of these environmental issues directly or indirectly on the lives of people in these communities? In this Innovation and Impact course, students will use methods including site visits, research, interviews, and more to better understand some of the environmental inequities in our region. Students will research a variety of polluted sites and related environmental issues to explore issues of environmental inequity and to design approaches that address this inequity. Students will deliver a final project that proposes an approach on how to improve, educate, remediate, or advocate for a method that would support community members in addressing environmental issues. Examples of environmental issues may include brownfields, air pollution, incinerators, and other planned developments on current green spaces.